Hey folks I’m back!

After a short time of illness, I’m ready to pick up the metaphorical baton again and sprint toward the finishing line of improving your understanding of what really works and doesn’t in the world of strategic management.

This week I want to talk to you about corporate strategies. What are they?  Well, in my career I’ve been involved in several of these and generally speaking they’re a means through which a company tries to appear to itself and indeed to others that t knows what it’s doing. Often great efforts are made, a prolonged consultative process, based on large amounts of second rate analysis, and a hellish drafting process results in a document that is of so little value that it is placed on a website, shelved in the CEO’s office and those of the senior managers, but quickly forgotten by everyone who had the great misfortune to be involved.

God bless strategic planning!

Like all strategies or plans, it becomes irrelevant through the actual process of creating it – just setting it down on paper seems to have an almost supernatural ability to render it completely irrelevant and useless. Why is this? What’s going on here? What can we learn from this?

Well the first thing to learn is that some things in business are better left unspoken, especially if they’re already working quite well in an organic and unintended organization (most medium to small companies).  Suddenly trying to capture and codify all of that (vision, mission, objectives, indicators, projects and programme with outputs and deliverables and all that jazz) forces individuals to suddenly face up to these issues and choices, realizing in the process that they are so far removed from most of their peers, both in their thoughts and attitudes, that their confidence in the very company is shaken and they regard to strategy as a manifesto of the stupids.

And so the plan, the strategy, whatever it is, is rejected by its authors, forgotten, and everyone forgets or rejects it for a different reason. But that’s not important, the important things is that most people on the organization will want nothing to do with it.  There will be exceptions of course, many companies have an Ivy League poindexter who will wail and moan about your failure of manage the strategy, you may also have something even worse, the autodidact who got his MBA online and grasped all the details but say none of the big pictures – he/she’ll drive you crazy too.

So what’s to be done?

The secret is to go with the flow, remember what you value about your work, remember what you care about and get up in the morning for, and screw everyone else and their plans.  You don’t need plans to get results, you need winners.

Be a winner, not a planner.

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